Moral Relativism and Subjective Value

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Moral Relativism and Subjective Value

Imagine a universe in which there are no sentient, conscious beings. How valuable would gold be? How long would a meter be? What would be the meaning of good or evil or beautiful or ugly? With no one available to ascribe those values, what value would any of these concepts hold? Indeed what is meaning, itself, without sentience to assign it? Read On…

Nothing About this Economy Is Surprising

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Nothing About this Economy Is Surprising“Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” – Albert Einstein

This Einstein platitude is so overused that I’m somewhat embarrassed to be planting it at the beginning of this article. But then I think about how utterly applicable it is to this piteous disaster we still call the global economy, and its presence becomes profoundly justifiable. Read On…

When the Dollar Collapses, Where Will You Put Your Money?

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When the Dollar Collapses, Where Will You Put Your Money?Over the last several years, I have written a multitude of articles about my conviction that the global economy is destined to collapse on a scale humanity has never experienced before. But contrary to some insinuations, my primary objective with these articles is not to create fear and panic. My goal has always been to disseminate these theories to an audience capable of returning debate and criticism. If I am correct, I would hope to prepare at least some small contingency of readers; as a species, I am convinced human beings must find a new way of doing things — because the consequences of the old ways are descending upon us like a maelstrom. So I ask: when the dollar collapses, where will you put your money? Read On…

Bitcoin Adoption and Name-Brand Recognition

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Bitcoin Adoption and Name-brand RecognitionSince the advent of Bitcoin in 2009 — and the subsequent rise of thousands of ancillary imitators using the same algorithm — there hasn’t been much interest in the technology from big corporations around the globe. This isn’t surprising; the instruments are new, risky, and their collective goal is to decentralize and reduce the costs of global capital transfers. This presents huge potential threats to existing payment systems, and it stands to reason that any firm with a considerable market capitalization might want to take a wait-and-see approach.

For companies with sufficient capital and patience, however, there are opportunities developing that have gone unnoticed so far. The cryptocurrency market is maturing quickly. I believe the entire world is about to seriously consider the implications and potential of Bitcoin adoption and name-brand recognition. Read On…

Forgiveness and Compassion

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Forgiveness and Compassion“Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.” – Not Buddha

Despite my imperative to discover forgiveness and compassion by any means possible, I was reluctant to use this quote — simply because it is so abused by spiritual novitiates and pseudoscientists. It is most frequently attributed to Gautama Buddha, but I suspected the ascription might be incorrect, so I did a little digging. And I’m glad I did. Read On…

Gödel and the Proof of God

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Gödel and the Proof of GodIn 1931, Kurt Gödel introduced his Incompleteness Theorem to the world, and established that any system cannot be proven to be true using only its own content as premises — that is to say, it must rely on at least one external component for its validity. Likewise, that external component also cannot be proven to be true, intrinsically. The theorem is, essentially, a mathematical expression of the famous liar’s paradox:

This sentence is false.

Regardless of the point of origin, the riddle cannot be solved. Read On…

Cynics Are Missing the Bitcoin Boat

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Cynics Are Missing the Bitcoin BoatThe first Bitcoin crash happened in 2011. In this dramatic, optimistic surge, the cryptocurrency quickly rose to about $28 — and just as quickly fell to about $3. The gloomy naysayers, defeatists, and misanthropes came out of the woodwork — boldly asserting that cryptocurrencies were finished. And yet, through it all, Bitcoin has been remarkably resilient; for every “collapse,” it has rebounded vigorously — making new highs. Likewise, with each new surge, the pessimists have become ever more angry and critical. This despondent, dogmatic hatred is disappointing, because in reality, the cynics are missing the Bitcoin boat. Read On…

The Dangers of Militant Atheism

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The Danger of Militant AtheismI am a loyal fan of Richard Dawkins. As a Darwinian evolutionary biologist, his ideas are foremost among contemporary scholars in the discipline. In his 1976 masterpiece The Selfish Gene, he coined the word meme – which he used to represent the evolutionary spread of ideas and knowledge. Since then, the concept of the meme has gained universal adoption as a construct in human language and thought. Dawkins’ contributions to the growth of knowledge are immeasurable.

Dawkins also describes himself as an atheist, and can often be found debating and discussing in the company of other superb theological critics like Sam Harris, Christopher Hitchens, Dan Dennett, and Ayaan Hirsi Ali (a quick YouTube search show how viral Dawkins’s work has become). Yet as much as I admire Dr. Dawkins (and I have for over two decades), I am somewhat put off by his approach to the criticism of toxic religious ideas. To me, he squarely embodies the dangers of militant atheism. Read On…

Bitcoin Can Save Publishing

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Bitcoin Can Save PublishingJust as the advent of the personal computer heralded the end of the era of the typewriter, so too did the adoption of a global internet spell doom for print media. Of course, tablets and ebooks did their fair share of damage to paper-based information, as well. But regardless, the paradigm shift is in process: newspapers are closing around the globe, and media companies are struggling to find revenue models that work. With the advent of cryptcurrencies, however, micropayments have become a reality — and it’s starting to become clear that Bitcoin can save publishing. Read On…

The Disease of Dogmatism

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The Disease of DogmatismRarely have I struggled the way I do when I am confronted by the disease of dogmatism. It is, I believe, the greatest impediment to the growth of human knowledge — and to the betterment of mankind. It is a conundrum that has become less complicated over the centuries, but the continued slow rate of its exodus from our collective ethos troubles me deeply. Read On…

The U.S. and Europe Now Have an Opportunity to Dominate Bitcoin

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The U.S. and Europe Now Have an Opportunity to Dominate BitcoinAnyone from the west who believes the world’s financial center of power isn’t rapidly moving to Asia is either excessively prideful, excessively stupid, or both. China’s exploding middle class, strong manufacturing base, unstoppable work-ethic, and relatively low debt make it the perfect breeding ground for economic domination. Add Japan, Taiwan, Singapore, and South Korea into the mix, and it’s not hard to see that financial power has been shifting slowly for decades. However, the U.S. and Europe Now Have an Opportunity to Dominate Bitcoin. Read On…

Negotiating with the Reptile Brain: the Neurological Basis of Fear

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Negotiating with the Reptile Brain: the Neurological Basis of FearI have a passionate fascination with the human brain, with good reason — it has been called by innumerable experts the most complex mechanism in our universe. And I am convinced this is true.*

If my descriptions and observations are a little inaccurate, I beg your forgiveness early; I am not a neurologist or a neuro-scientist of any sort. So I feel obligated as usual, to disclaim any interpretations of authority that derive from this article. My zealous curiosity has simply gotten the best of me… again. And, of course, I eagerly welcome any corrections.

I borrow this analogy: the human brain is like a house that has been continuously improved and expanded over time. Read On…

Decoding DNA

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Decoding DNAThis is a follow-up to an earlier post — about the binary nature of DNA, and how remarkably close it is to the logical and mathematical systems (languages) human beings have invented to interact with computers. Perhaps the most interesting aspect to this odd coincidence is the fact that computer science advanced almost completely independently of discoveries in the field of genetics. This isn’t to say people haven’t seen the glaring similarities for years — and even succeeded at storing binary data as DNA. But to my knowledge, there has been no concerted, unified effort to think of DNA and the double helix as binary computer code (feel free to enlighten me if I am wrong). In other words, I’m not convinced this approach has been fully vetted when it comes to decoding DNA. Read On…

The Treasury Bubble Blows On

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The Treasury Bubble Blows On“In the absence of the gold standard, there is no way to protect savings from confiscation through inflation. There is no safe store of value. If there were, the government would have to make its holding illegal, as was done in the case of gold. If everyone decided, for example, to convert all his bank deposits to silver or copper or any other good, and thereafter declined to accept checks as payment for goods, bank deposits would lose their purchasing power and government-created bank credit would be worthless as a claim on goods. The financial policy of the welfare state requires that there be no way for the owners of wealth to protect themselves.” – Alan Greenspan

Before he sold his soul and renounced free market economics, Alan Greenspan was one of my heroes, and the above quote exemplifies why. Read On…

Still, the Dollar is Doomed

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the dollar is doomedI get a lot of inquiries about my continued position on the dollar and U.S. debt — mainly because I have so steadfastly and consistently proclaimed that the economy cannot sustain the sort of growth western nations have enjoyed for the last century. And yet stock markets continue to climb, and debt yields remain low. Things seem to be going well, but I maintain that still, the dollar is doomed. My detractors clamor for me to finally and unequivocally admit defeat — to concede that I have been wrong in all my economic prognoses. Read On…

Why Is the Government Impeding Same-sex Marriage?

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government impeding same-sex marriageIn 1967, the United States Supreme Court unanimously struck down a Virginia law that had been in place for 43 years, prohibiting people from different races from marrying one another. At stake was the freedom of an interracial couple who had each been sentenced to one year in prison for breaking the Virginia statute — categorized as “mixing of the races,” or miscegenation. Fast forward almost five decades, and we find ourselves battling yet another form of prejudicial ignorance, and forcing ourselves to ask the question: why is the government impeding same-sex marriage? Read On…

Should Bitcoin Be Legal?

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Should Bitcoin Be Legal?Should Bitcoin be legal? Governments seem unwilling to take a stand, and with good reason: a premature attack in this arena could be a huge misstep.

Do you remember Napster? The government aimed all its might at the online file-sharing network, ultimately forcing it to shut down in 2001. Perhaps regulators and law-enforcement — in all of their wisdom — believed they were doing a good thing when they pursued legal action against Napster. But in reality, the hasty reaction had a clear unintended consequence — creating a proverbial hydra. Read On…

Pseudoscience is Dangerous and Destructive

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Pseudoscience is Dangerous and DestructiveThere is nothing more perilous to human progress and the growth of knowledge than spiritual, philosophical, or religious principles that are packaged up and presented as “fact” — under the guise of science. The practice is most terrifying because its presentation is so often seductive and subtle. But make no mistake about it: pseudoscience is dangerous and destructive. In fact, I wouldn’t hesitate to compare it with pestilence, poverty, and even war — when considering its pernicious consequences. Read On…

Bitcoin Price Growth Makes Sense: It Is a Safe Haven

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Bitcoin Price Growth Makes Sense: It Is a Safe HavenHistorically, in every inflationary context, when a national currency becomes unstable, the people depending on that money look for alternatives. From Germany, to Zimbabwe, to Argentina, when hyperinflation appeared, people found it necessary to immediately convert from the given broken currency to something more stable. And that’s why I say Bitcoin price growth makes sense: it is a safe haven. Read On…

Bitcoin Is More Than a Currency

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Bitcoin Is More Than a CurrencyIs Bitcoin money?

The arguments from both sides of the aisle are passionate and vociferous. But as I trudge through the morass of opinions, I can’t help but notice people are missing some crucial details about private cryptocurrencies — and how they are changing our world. One thing seems certain, however: Bitcoin is more than a currency. Read On…

Approaching Certainty

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Approaching CertaintyIf I had to point to the single most problematic weakness in human beings, it would be the dogmatism and arrogant certitude that leads us to entrench. Individually and collectively, we become so confident in our beliefs that we will sacrifice everything in order to defend “being right.” Families disintegrate. Wars take millions of lives. Still we persist: we arrogantly proclaim that dissent is poisonous and must be punished. And yet, even the most perspicacious human being would have to consider himself fortunate even to be approaching certainty. Read On…

Bitcoin vs Gold

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bitcoin vs goldSince its inception in 2009, Bitcoin’s controversy has raged. Its libertarian proponents see the digital currency as the killer of central banks everywhere. Its detractors have labeled it a binary bubble — calling it the most elaborate Ponzi scheme of all time. Most often, the latter arguments center on the misplaced belief that anything of value must be “backed” by something else – whether a stream of earnings, a commodity (like gold or oil), or the full faith and credit of a government.

Regardless of which camp you subscribe to, if you are reading this article, you too are undoubtedly curious about this question: what does make a digital currency (or anything else, for that matter) valuable? And how does the “bitcoin vs. gold” analysis stack up? Read On…

Is String Theory Science if it Isn’t Falsifiable?

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String Theory Drawing by XKCD - Is String Theory Science if it Isn't Falsifiable?I’m very intersted and curious about string theory. I’ve read everything I can find by Brian Green, Michio Kaku, and the other “faces of string theory” out there today. But it only takes a couple of exposures to prime-time, pop-science television shows on Discovery, NatGeo, or The Science Channel to realize that this is more the stuff of Star Trek than it is Neils Bohr and Albert Einstein. So, is string theory science if it isn’t falsifiable? Read On…

Surrendering to the Indomitable Direction of the Universe

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Surrendering to the Indomitable Direction of the Universe“The highest excellence is like (that of) water. The excellence of water appears in its benefiting all things, and in its occupying, without striving (to the contrary), the low place which all men dislike. Hence (its way) is near to (that of) the Dao.” – Lao Tzu

Some people are surprised to discover I am an avid fan of traditional Taoist and Buddhist teachings. This bewilderment derives from the misconception that Taoism and Buddhism are necessarily organized religions. Read On…

For Texas to Secede

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Texas to Secede

UPDATE: This article was not written in support of Rick Perry, and I’m somewhat surprised at having to be explicit about that. I decry polarization, and as such, I am neither a Republican, a Democrat, a Libertarian, nor a Socialist — nor do I belong to any other party. I adhere to the Austrian school of economic thought, and I hold a Popperian epistemological view of the universe. And I am a native Texan.


Texas Governor Rick Perry took a prodigious amount of criticism for his brave statements not long ago — in which he intimated his support for the movement for Texas to secede. I applauded his words then, and redouble my admiration now. Read On…

Humanity Needs Easy Mathematical Communication

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Humanity Needs Easy Mathematical CommunicationI watched a documentary about Stephen Hawking recently, and one of the most striking things about this amazing man is the fact that for decades, he has only been able to communicate at four words per minute. As I watched his story, I began to think about the history of written communication. And just as quickly, I began to think about how difficult it must be for someone like Stephen Hawking to impart formulas in a computational context. It occurred to me how much humanity needs easy mathematical communication. Read On…

Some Very Interesting Facts About Capitalism

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facts about capitalism

Here are some very interesting facts about capitalism:

1.  The term Capitalism was popularized by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. They explicitly coined the term to refer to the owners of private wealth. This term is a Communist interpretation of markets — from a decidedly egalitarian perspective. It is based on a context in which governments own a significant portion of the capital in society and the economy. It is incomplete and utterly incompatible with concept of free markets – especially as defined by the Austrian School of Economics.
Read On…

Hedging Against Inflation

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Hedging Against InflationInflationary price increases are not coming… they are already here. The Fed wants you to believe that we are still experiencing falling prices, but the Fed also wants to tell you that food (commodities) and energy don’t count. The Fed is lying to you. Let’s have a look at three areas in which you need to start hedging against inflation. Read On…

The Keynesian Solvency Standoff

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The Keynesian Solvency Standoff“Markets can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent.”

– John Maynard Keynes

What, exactly, constitutes “solvency?” I am no fan of Keynes, but why should I be? He even loathed himself by the time he stood before his maker. His theories are preposterous, and he knew it! And with every day that passes, we get ever closer to the inevitable collapse of the American empire, caused by decades of reckless abuse of the financial system by the federal government — all justified by Keynesian theory. The evidence abounds: Read On…

The Information Age and the End of the United States of America

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The Information Age and the End of the United States of AmericaYou are losing your rights.

You probably don’t believe it… you’ve heard it all before. And yet everything has turned out okay, hasn’t it? And this time it will be the same… as long as “okay” means a failing currency, hyperinflation, a systematic destruction of the middle class, and the end of the United States’ role as the world’s preeminent financial power — and, indeed, its role as a sovereign nation. And yet, like it or not, we are facing the end of the United States of America.

Read On…

Japan, the U.S., and Quantitative Easing

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Japan, The U.S., and Quantitative Easing“When future historians look back on our way of curing inflation, they’ll probably compare it to bloodletting in the Middle Ages.” - Lee Iacocca

Japan, the U.S., and Quantiative Easing…

For those of you who aren’t familiar with quantitative easing: it is the important-sounding way central banks manage the economy through monetary policy. The most common way is by manipulating the rate at which they loan to other banks; when the economy is running too hot, the central bank will raise the rate at which it loans money — thereby discouraging borrowing and capital investment. Likewise, if the economy is in the tank a central bank can lower the rate at which it lends to other banks, thereby encouraging borrowing and capital investment in the economy. Read On…

The Imminence of Economic Catastrophe

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The Imminence of Economic Catastrophe“There is no means of avoiding the final collapse of a boom brought about by credit expansion. The question is only whether the crisis should come sooner as a result of a voluntary abandonment of further credit expansion, or later as a final and total catastrophe of the currency system involved.’ There has never been any attempt to abandon the credit expansion. Indeed any crisis was simply an excuse to open the monetary spigots. This, then, is the beginning of the total catastrophe of the American dollar, indeed the entire world monetary and financial structure.” - Ludwig von Mises

The more I read, the more appalled I become. I am terrified by the imminence of economic catastrophe; it may take years, but as I look around at the general level of ignorance and hubris in the United States today, I can’t help but thinking — yet again — that we deserve what’s coming. Read On…

Fighting the Recession: An Ill Wind Indeed

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Fighting the Recession: An Ill Wind Indeed“[It is an] ill wind which blows no man good.” – William Shakespeare

Fighting the recession: an ill wind indeed!

I don’t know what I did before YouTube. With just a few mouse clicks, I can pull up literally hundreds of interviews, editorials, and broadcasts about anything that suits my fancy. And lately, my fancy consists of interviews with some of the most vocal and compelling philosophical, and financial minds daring to speak out against the atrocious fiscal policies the U.S. is employing to battle this economic crisis. Read On…

The Death of the Dollar

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The Death of the Dollar“We have experienced asset bubbles, and we now have an economy that is more highly leveraged than it ever has been in the post-World-War II period. Greenspan has been instrumental in bringing about this high leverage.” - Paul Kasriel

“A dollar saved is a quarter earned.” - John Ciardi

I have been an analyst, a portfolio manager, and a financial writer for more than 18 years, and until early last year my focus was almost exclusively on individual stocks and value investing. In my book Discipline, however — which I completed in 2001 and published in 2007 – I took a more macro stance, predicting an economic collapse resulting in the death of the dollar and a Soviet-style break up of the country. Read On…

Inflation is an Unsustainable Lie

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Inflation is an Unsustainable Lie“I continue to believe that the American people have a love-hate relationship with inflation. They hate inflation but love everything that causes it.” -William E. Simon

“If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.” - Joseph Goebbels

“By a continuing process of inflation, government can confiscate, secretly and unobserved, an important part of the wealth of their citizens.” - John Maynard Keynes

Inflation is an unsustainable lie. Of course, the veracity of this statement relies on the span of time to which the observer attributes “sustainability,” because it is a lie that has persisted for almost a century. Read On…

Recession, Stimulus, Inflation, and the Average American

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Recession, Stimulus, Inflation, and the Average American“Inflation can be pursued only so long as the public still does not believe it will continue. Once the people generally realize that the inflation will be continued on and on and that the value of the monetary unit will decline more and more, then the fate of the money is sealed. Only the belief, that the inflation will come to a stop, maintains the value of the notes.” – Ludwig von Mises

This economic collapse will be the metric for all future crashes and currency failures. It will be the beacon by which we forever view recession, stimulus, inflation, and the average American. It will create global unrest on a level never before seen, and the world order is going to transform unimaginably. I predict within the next few decades, Austrian theory will be the basis of all economic and financial curricula in the world. And I believe Keynesian theory will be an afterthought — taught as an obscure history course. Read On…

Gold is Safer Than Treasuries as a Hedge Against Inflation

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Gold is Safer Than Treasuries as Hedge Against Inflation“Truth, like gold, is to be obtained not by its growth, but by washing away from it all that is not gold.”  – Leo Nikolaevich Tolstoy

Any time an asset increases in dollar terms, you have to ask yourself two questions:

1. Is the asset rising alone, relative to the rest of the economy?

2. Or is the asset rising in value along with everything else in the economy?

These two questions have led me to believe that gold is safer than Treasuries as a hedge against inflation. Read On…

We Are Not Experiencing Consumer-driven Deflation

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We Are Not Experiencing Consumer-driven Deflation“Inflation is the senility of democracies” - Sylvia Townsend Warner

If you ask the average person to define inflation, you invariably get this response: “Rising prices.” Similarly, the same person would likely define deflation as “falling prices.” But both answers are incorrect; in fact they are gross misrepresentations of the words. And this simple but popular misconception is the root of every single economic problem we face today: we are not experiencing consumer-driven deflation. Read On…

An Artificial Economy

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An Artificial Economy“Instead of furthering the inevitable liquidation of the maladjustments brought about by the boom during the last three years, all conceivable means have been used to prevent that readjustment from taking place; and one of these means, which has been repeatedly tried though without success, from the earliest to the most recent stages of depression, has been this deliberate policy of credit expansion. . . . To combat the depression by a forced credit expansion is to attempt to cure the evil by the very means which brought it about; because we are suffering from a misdirection of production, we want to create further misdirection — a procedure that can only lead to a much more severe crisis as soon as the credit expansion comes to an end. . . . It is probably to this experiment, together with the attempts to prevent liquidation once the crisis had come, that we owe the exceptional severity and duration of the depression. We must not forget that, for the last six or eight years, monetary policy all over the world has followed the advice of the stabilizers. It is high time that their influence, which has already done harm enough, should be overthrown.” –Friedrich August von Hayek (1932)

Your government is creating bubbles all around you, in an artificial economy.  Read On…

The Intrinsic Value of Nothing, Part Two

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Intrinsic Value of Nothing“There is no such thing as prices outside the market. Prices cannot be constructed synthetically, as it were…

It is ultimately always the subjective value judgments of individuals that determine the formation of prices…”

— Ludwig von Mises, Human Action

“During thousands of years, in all parts of the inhabited earth, innumerable sacrifices have been made to the chimera of just and reasonable prices.” - Ludwig von Mises, The Theory of Money and Credit

In my previous article (Part One of this two-part series), I discussed the fallacy of intrinsic value – especially as it relates to the U.S. dollar, and the shell game the federal government has been playing for the last hundred years or so. In the tornado of debate, castigation, and general mayhem that ensued, some good points emerged – not the least significant of which was the observation that there is a difference between exchange value and use (or utilitarian) value. Read On…

The Intrinsic Value of Nothing, Part One

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Intrinsic Value of Nothing“Action is purposive conduct. It is not simply behavior, but behavior begot by judgments of value, aiming at a definite end and guided by ideas concerning the suitability or unsuitability of definite means. . . . It is conscious behavior. It is choosing. It is volition; it is a display of the will.” - Ludwig von Mises

Reach in your wallet, and pull out a dollar bill. Look at it for a moment. Now ask yourself, what is this worth? Next, consider the intrinsic value of nothing – because the idea that anything has “intrinsic value” is a fallacy. Read On…

The God Complex: A Permanent Ban on Financial Derivatives

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The God Complex: A Permanent Ban on Financial Derivatives“Knowing a great deal is not the same as being smart; intelligence is not information alone but also judgment, the manner in which information is collected and used” – Dr. Carl Sagan

A surprising number of people in the world today believe society should create a permanent ban on financial derivatives — claiming they are nothing more than gambling instruments, whose only function is to deprive innocent and uninitiated investors of their hard-earned money. And then there are those who know better. Read On…

Outpacing Inflation

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Outpacing Inflation“Excess capacity is temporarily suppressing global prices. But I see inflation as the greater future challenge.” - Alan Greenspan, June 25, 2009

“The US economy may witness double-digit inflation in a few years unless the central bank tightens up its monetary policy… Unless we roll in this whole degree of expansion, we will be in trouble… I am not talking 3-5 per cent inflation, I am talking double-digit inflation in the US.” - Alan Greenspan, September 9, 2009

Alan Greenspan was, in his prime, an economist nonpareil. Recently, however, he shocked many of us by submitting to a political machine that needed to find a scapegoat for the recent economic nightmare. Read On…

Short the USA

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Short the USA“By a continuing process of inflation, governments can confiscate, secretly and unobserved, an important part of the wealth of their citizens. There is no subtler, no surer means of overturning the existing basis of society than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose.” - John Maynard Keynes

I am lucky to have friends. But it’s not merely the number of people I can count among their ranks that makes me lucky — it is the sheer magnitude of their knowledge and experience. And yet at the same time, my friends — in the aggregate — exhibit a remarkably wide array of beliefs and perspectives. I endure a lot of criticism from them for my theories — most notably my belief in the imminent failure of our current economic system, and the fact that (at least financially), I am short the USA. Read On…