Archive for the ‘Bubble’ Category

Japan, the U.S., and Quantitative Easing

Japan, The U.S., and Quantitative Easing“When future historians look back on our way of curing inflation, they’ll probably compare it to bloodletting in the Middle Ages.” – Lee Iacocca

Japan, the U.S., and Quantiative Easing…

For those of you who aren’t familiar with quantitative easing: it is the important-sounding way central banks manage the economy through monetary policy. The most common way is by manipulating the rate at which they loan to other banks; when the economy is running too hot, the central bank will raise the rate at which it loans money — thereby discouraging borrowing and capital investment. Likewise, if the economy is in the tank a central bank can lower the rate at which it lends to other banks, thereby encouraging borrowing and capital investment in the economy. Read On…

Inflation is an Unsustainable Lie

Inflation is an Unsustainable Lie“I continue to believe that the American people have a love-hate relationship with inflation. They hate inflation but love everything that causes it.” -William E. Simon

“If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.” – Joseph Goebbels

“By a continuing process of inflation, government can confiscate, secretly and unobserved, an important part of the wealth of their citizens.” – John Maynard Keynes

Inflation is an unsustainable lie. Of course, the veracity of this statement relies on the span of time to which the observer attributes “sustainability,” because it is a lie that has persisted for almost a century. Read On…

An Artificial Economy

An Artificial Economy“Instead of furthering the inevitable liquidation of the maladjustments brought about by the boom during the last three years, all conceivable means have been used to prevent that readjustment from taking place; and one of these means, which has been repeatedly tried though without success, from the earliest to the most recent stages of depression, has been this deliberate policy of credit expansion. . . . To combat the depression by a forced credit expansion is to attempt to cure the evil by the very means which brought it about; because we are suffering from a misdirection of production, we want to create further misdirection — a procedure that can only lead to a much more severe crisis as soon as the credit expansion comes to an end. . . . It is probably to this experiment, together with the attempts to prevent liquidation once the crisis had come, that we owe the exceptional severity and duration of the depression. We must not forget that, for the last six or eight years, monetary policy all over the world has followed the advice of the stabilizers. It is high time that their influence, which has already done harm enough, should be overthrown.” –Friedrich August von Hayek (1932)

Your government is creating bubbles all around you, in an artificial economy.  Read On…

The Intrinsic Value of Nothing, Part Two

Intrinsic Value of Nothing“There is no such thing as prices outside the market. Prices cannot be constructed synthetically, as it were…

It is ultimately always the subjective value judgments of individuals that determine the formation of prices…”

— Ludwig von Mises, Human Action

“During thousands of years, in all parts of the inhabited earth, innumerable sacrifices have been made to the chimera of just and reasonable prices.” – Ludwig von Mises, The Theory of Money and Credit

In my previous article (Part One of this two-part series), I discussed the fallacy of intrinsic value – especially as it relates to the U.S. dollar, and the shell game the federal government has been playing for the last hundred years or so. In the tornado of debate, castigation, and general mayhem that ensued, some good points emerged – not the least significant of which was the observation that there is a difference between exchange value and use (or utilitarian) value. Read On…